Draw comic book eyes. HOW TO DRAW AN EYE – STEP BY STEP

Comic books are a great way to tell stories and engage with your audience.

However, drawing comic book eyes can be difficult. They need to be expressive and accurate, while still looking like comic book eyes.

draw comic book eyes
draw comic book eyes

Our easy to use comic book eye drawing tool makes it simple to create amazing-looking eyes that will make your comics stand out from the rest.

Basic Structure Of Drawing Comic Book Eyes

In contrast to the “almond-shaped” symbol often used to depict eyeballs in children’s drawings and other graphics, the actual shape of the eyeball is more rounded. When seen from the front, the eyes have a more parallelogram-like form. The top lid is also thinner and more movable than the bottom one. This one’s lower counterpart is more of a foundation, and it has a substantial form. Finally, pay attention to how the eye socket encloses the pupil and upper and lower eyelids.

In contrast to the “almond-shaped” symbol often used to depict eyeballs in children’s drawings and other graphics, the actual shape of the eyeball is more rounded. When seen from the front, the eyes have a more parallelogram-like form. The top lid is also thinner and more movable than the bottom one. This one’s lower counterpart is more of a foundation, and it has a substantial form. Finally, pay attention to how the eye socket encloses the pupil and upper and lower eyelids.

Choosing the Right Place for Your Eyes

The eyes are located in the center of the face in an average realistic adult face. The majority of students like to sit in the middle of the row.

The eyes are a useful way to gauge the face’s dimensions. The eyes are separated by one eye from each other and by one eye from the edge when seen from the front. The distance may look narrower because of bangs or sideburns.

Don’t sweat the lack of symmetry too much. The drawing should be horizontally flipped till it looks good in both directions. The symmetry of a human face isn’t flawless.

When seen from the side, the eye seems to be slanted due to the placement inside the socket.

Planes Of The Eyes

Even if the shape of the pupil is somewhat oblong, the eye may be portrayed as a perfect sphere. There is a small outward protrusion of the upper and lower lids before they return to the socket. It is possible to see parallelogram-like folds in the lids’ outline, although this is not the only possible interpretation. The parallelogram is marked in purple, while the lids’ divisions are marked in green.

 

Drawing Comic Book Eyes

Step 1 – Drawing the Basic Shape of the Eye

Step 1 - Drawing the Basic Shape of the Eye
Drawing Comic Art Style Eye Tutorial

To begin, I prefer to concentrate on the eye’s general shape and the angle from the tear duct to the other side where the eyelids meet, since these are important considerations. Early on, I noticed an upward slant, which made it easy to draw them consistently.

Playing around with different eye shapes is a lot of fun at this point. Make the forms narrower, rounder, pointed to one side, and so on. Practice makes perfect. Isn’t it fun to play around with comic book character types?

Step 2 – Drawing the Iris and the Pupil

Step 2 - Drawing the Iris and the Pupil
Step 2 – Drawing the Iris and the Pupil

For the second step, draw in the iris and the pupil. A good rule of thumb is that the iris is about one third the distance across of the eye. To be honest I experiment with this proportion as well. Sometimes to really push the expression of fear or excitement I will purposely make the iris smaller by comparison. It’s comics so we can get away with it I promise.

Also notice that the iris is touching the top eye lid. This gives a more relaxed look to the eye. Subtle differences in the position of the iris and pupil can change the expression of the character so keep an eye on it!

Step 3 – Drawing the Shape of the Eyelid

Step 3 - Drawing the Shape of the Eyelid
Step 3 – Drawing the Shape of the Eyelid

In this third step, draw the shape of the eyelid. This can pretty much follow the existing edges but I like to taper it a bit taller as it moves around the rounded or middle part of the eye. We have to try to envision the spherical form of the eye ball beneath the skin. Again, play around with this area within your work to find what suits your style the best.

Step 4 – Drawing the Shape of the Eye Lashes

Step 4 - Drawing the Shape of the Eye Lashes
Step 4 – Drawing the Shape of the Eye Lashes

The eye lashes are best drawn as broad basic forms in the fourth stage. As a comics artist, this is a great way to speed up the process, particularly when you’re painting tiny faces in the scene. Close-up shots benefit greatly from individual eye lashes, but that’s about it. Moreover, as you’ll see in a moment, you can always put things in.

This is one of those occasions when you may play around with a wide range of shapes and sizes. To be honest, this point of the project didn’t seem good, but I was confident in my ability to salvage it, so I kept on. It’s sometimes necessary to keep tinkering and not give up on a problem.

Step 5 – Drawing in the Shape of the Eyebrow

Step 5 - Drawing in the Shape of the Eyebrow
Step 5 – Drawing in the Shape of the Eyebrow

The glare and shadows on the iris will be drawn in this stage. ‘ This is how you draw the shadow on the iris. This serves to reinforce the idea that the eye is a spherical rather than a flat entity. Afterwards, fill in the glare on the eye’s highest point, which is normally directly next to the pupil of the subject. But you already knew that, didn’t you? Another opportunity to experiment with your own style.

Step 6 – Drawing the Glare and Shadow

Step 6 - Drawing the Glare and Shadow to the Eye
Step 6 – Drawing the Glare and Shadow to the Eye

The glare and shadow on the iris will be drawn in this stage. Draw a curved shadow over the iris. This makes the eye seem to be a spherical rather than a flat thing. Afterwards, draw in the glare on the eye’s highest point, which is normally directly next to the eye’s pupil. Another opportunity to experiment with your own style, but you already knew that, didn’t you?

Step 7 – Draw in the Shadows and Add Some Eye Lashes

Step 7 - Draw in the Shadows and the Eye Lashes
Step 7 – Draw in the Shadows and the Eye Lashes

We may apply some eyelashes and shadows in this phase. When I do this, I usually wind up reshaping the eyelashes in the process. In order to experiment with various eyelash effects, I may sometimes delete the contour of the outside border. I like seeing how other comic artists approach this aspect of their craft. It’s always a pleasure to examine the eyes of the late Michael Turner (RIP). Awe-inspiring and breathtaking are only two words to describe his art.

Step 8 – The Final Rendering

Step 8 - The Final RenderingStep 8 – The Final Rendering

In this final step, soft eraser all those rough lines and clean it up. I like to push and pull the lines here. Some need a little more curve and some need a little less. I also like to add in a bit of cross hatching to the eyes to create a look of tonal value. And, that’s it. You can take these same steps and apply them to all sorts of eye variations.

Different Angles

Step 1: Start with that basic orange section.

Step 2: Add the folds that wrap around this sphere shape.

 

Step 3: Draw in the pupil and iris. 

 

 

Step 3: Lastly, shade in the dark areas of the pupil and iris.

Also add some shadow and lashes to give the eye more volume.  These eyes are in extreme close up shots so I included some extra lashes but in a normal mid-shit of a character you will want to simplify these lashes.

Comic Book Style

With comic books, you will have to work rapidly, thus you will need to develop shortcuts and develop your own style. That can only be achieved by a great deal of repetition.

While working on your comic book eye designs, keep these factors in mind:

Intentional line weights help to keep your lines angular.

The shadow side of the lids and folds may be used to convey minor features.

Simplify at all costs.

Using many drawings is the best approach to complete these objectives. Underneath the last set of lines, you’ll see a layer of light blue lines. I sketch out the skull eye socket with a spherical within in the underdrawing. After that, I drew the eyelids and lashes without of regard for aesthetics or line quality. Finally, I’ll use a careful and basic technique to draw down the final pencil lines and shadows, while keeping an eye on the shapes and lighting.

Additional lashes and shadow information:

Drawing eyes At the penciling stage of comics, eye lashes and lighting are often mixed. If you’re new to the world of comics and want to learn more about the many positions in the business, check out our Beginner’s Guide to Drawing Comics.

The lashes on the top lid tend to point back toward the center of the eyeball, which is why they are more noticeable there. As a result, the outer corners of the eyes seem fuller in the front view. To that, we may add the most typical lighting setup, which casts a heavy shadow from overhead. As a reminder, you’ll need to modify your shadows based on whether or not your subject has eastern or western eyes.

F.A.Q: Draw comic book eyes

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