what were the causes and effects of the civil war in russia?

what were the causes and effects of the civil war in russia?

The Russian Civil War was a multi-sided conflict that took place in Russia from 1917 to 1922.

what were the causes and effects of the civil war in russia?
what were the causes and effects of the civil war in russia?

The war was fought between the Bolshevik Red Army and various White armies, supported by outside powers.

The Bolsheviks emerged victorious and established the Soviet Union.

What led to the outbreak of the Russian Civil War and what were its consequences?

What led to the outbreak of civil war in Russia and what were its consequences? The Bolshevik party served as the movement’s driving force. The communist ideology and the principle that all people should be treated equally were disseminated by Lenin’s Bolsheviks. The Russian Civil War ultimately led to the formation of the Soviet Union as a result of its effects.
Bolshevik party
The two largest combatant groups were the Red Army, which fought for the Bolshevik form of socialism and was led by Vladimir Lenin, and the loosely allied forces known as the White Army. The White Army included a variety of interests favoring political monarchism, capitalism, and social democracy, each of which had democratic and anti-democratic components.

What led to the outbreak of civil war in Russia and why did it last so long?

Between 1918 and 1921, Russia was going to be torn apart by the Russian Civil War, which lasted for those three years. After November 1917, a large number of organizations that were hostile to Lenin’s Bolsheviks arose, which ultimately led to the civil war. These organizations consisted of monarchists, militarists, and for a brief period of time, nations from other countries.

What Kinds Of Changes Came About As A Result Of The Russian Civil War?

The Russian Civil War smothered the revolution, crushed democracy, and paved the ground for the dictatorship that was established by Stalin. This was the unanticipated outcome that resulted from the conduct of all of the belligerents, including the Great Powers, the Reds, and the Whites. The repercussions of this have continued to ripple through the decades and may still be felt now.

What were the most significant factors that led up to the Russian Revolution, and what were its end results?

What were the most significant factors that led up to the Russian Revolution, and what were its end results?
What were the most significant factors that led up to the Russian Revolution, and what were its end results?

There are three primary factors that led to the Russian Revolution: political, social, and economic factors… They were the pillars upon which the Russian Revolution was built since, as a result of its success, they were able to turn a feudal state into a flourishing country known as the USSR that was hungry to exercise worldwide dominance.

What Factors Led to the Outbreak of the Russian Civil War Quizlet?

The collapse of the provisional government led by Kerensky, the expansion of the authority of the soviets, the treaty of Brest-Litovsk, which infuriated Russians, and the desire of the Bolsheviks to eradicate all of their adversaries were the primary factors that led to the Russian Civil War. The result was a triumph for the Bolsheviks against the Whites, although 14,000,000,000 people were killed.

How did the events of the Russian Revolution affect the Russian Federation?

I The authoritarian Tsarist government in Russia was brought to an end as a result of the Russian Revolution. The Romanov dynasty was destroyed as a result. (ii) It resulted in the formation of the first communist and socialist government in the history of the globe. (iii) The newly installed Soviet government made public its decision to end its participation in the First World War.

What Kind of a Future Awaited Those Who Survived the Russian Civil War?

The victory of the war went to the Red Army, which was superior not just in terms of unity but also in terms of organization and territorial control. In 1922, just after the end of World War I, communists founded the Soviet Union. The February Revolution of 1917 resulted in Tsar Nicholas II, the conventional authoritarian ruler of the Russian Empire, being dethroned from his position on the throne.

What were the primary factors that led to the outbreak of the civil war between the Bolsheviks and the Russian Army and other socialists who were not Bolsheviks?

What were the primary factors that led to the outbreak of the civil war between the Bolsheviks and the Russian Army and other socialists who were not Bolsheviks?
What were the primary factors that led to the outbreak of the civil war between the Bolsheviks and the Russian Army and other socialists who were not Bolsheviks?

The following are some of the factors that contributed to the outbreak of civil war: I When the Bolsheviks ordered the redistribution of land, the Russian army started to disband. (ii) A large number of the soldiers, who were mostly peasants, left their posts in order to return home and participate in the redistribution. (iii) Socialists, liberals, and supporters of autocracy who were not Bolsheviks voiced their disapproval of the Bolshevik revolt.

What Kind of Impact Did It Have On The Russian Economy During the Civil War?

The Bolsheviks were forced to adopt a more severe economic policy as a result of the Civil War. This policy was referred to as “War Communism,” and it was primarily characterized by the expropriation of private business and industry as well as the forced requisition of grain and other food products from the peasants.

In what ways were the Bolsheviks impacted by the Russian Civil War?

After the beginning of the Civil War, the Bolsheviks outlawed all political parties and jailed the leaders of those parties. Additionally, they stifled opposition by shutting down publications. In order to assist in providing for the war effort, “war communism” was instituted. In May of 1918, the Bolsheviks instituted a Food Dictatorship, under which they demanded that the peasants turn up their food supplies.

What are the three factors that contributed to the Russian Revolution?

A look at some of the factors that contributed to the Russian Revolution
The czars’ authoritarian ways of running things, as well as their aversion to change.
a failure to achieve either industrialization or economic development.
The war between Russia and Japan.
Bloody Sunday.
The First World War
See also the explanation of the word butte here.

What were the five most significant factors that led up to the Russian Revolution in 1917?

Explanations of the Top 5 Factors That Led to the Russian Revolution
Czarist Rule was Completely Autocratic:
The Official Russification Policy:
The Structure of Society:
The Influence of the Industrial Revolution on the Development of Nihilism:

Which Effects Did the Russian Revolution Have On Quizlet?

Which Effects Did the Russian Revolution Have On Quizlet?
Which Effects Did the Russian Revolution Have On Quizlet?

Develop becoming the world’s first communist state. The proletariat will rule as a dictatorship. Reforms that are on the up and up, including improved working conditions The ability to choose, shorter working hours, and liberties such as freedom of expression and unions were all key factors that prevented a farm uprising.

What led up to, and what were the consequences of, the American Civil War?

The institution of slavery in newly formed territories and states became a particularly contentious topic of discussion, which contributed to the already fraught relationship between the North and the South. The election of Abraham Lincoln as the 16th President of the United States in the year 1860 was the event that eventually precipitated the outbreak of the Civil War in the United States.

The Russian Civil War Quizlet Answers What Was It?

The struggle that took place between 1918 and 1920, in which the Red Army was victorious in its defense of the newly founded Bolshevik government against different Russian and interventionist anti-Bolshevik troops. Army on Army: Red vs White.

What exactly led to the civil war that Lenin started in Russia, and what were its consequences?

Grazhdanskaya voyna v Rossii was a multi-party civil war in the former Russian Empire that took place between 7 November 1917 and 16 June 1923. It was sparked by the overthrow of the monarchy and the failure of a new republican government to maintain stability. During this time, many factions vied to determine Russia’s political future, which resulted in the formation of…

After the Revolution, what kind of changes occurred in Russia?

Following the conclusion of the Russian Revolution, Germany and Russia came to an agreement to end World War I by signing a peace deal known as the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk. The previous agricultural economy of Russia was replaced with an industrial one once the new government assumed control of all of the country’s industries. In addition to this, it took agricultural land from its owners and redistributed it among the peasants.

What are the reasons why people start revolutions?

The reasons of revolutions may be divided into two categories: structural and temporary. The structural reasons are long-term and large-scale tendencies that erode existing social structures and connections, while the transitory causes are contingent occurrences or acts by specific persons or groups that expose the influence of longer term trends and are often…

What Kind of Impact Did Stalin’s Push for Rapid Industrialization Have on Russia?

What Kind of Impact Did Stalin's Push for Rapid Industrialization Have on Russia?
What Kind of Impact Did Stalin’s Push for Rapid Industrialization Have on Russia?

In 1928, Stalin initiated a state-directed initiative to rapidly industrialize the country. The development of transportation networks, the construction of factories, and the encouragement and even coercion of people to put in more effort… This goal was aided in its accomplishment by Stalin’s strategy of industrialization, which, however, came at the expense of the lives of countless Russians.

What were the driving forces behind the Russian Revolution?

Suffering on a massive scale as a result of living under an autocracy, which is a system of governance in which one person, in this instance the czar, has total control.
Weak leadership provided by Czar Nicholas II, who, despite the changing circumstances, stuck to tyranny.
Unsafe working conditions, inadequate salaries, and the risks of industrialisation all contribute to unsafe working circumstances.

What was it that brought an end to the Russian Civil War?

The 7th of November 1917 till the 25th of October 1922

Explaining this question with specific examples, why did Russia have a civil war?

The civil war broke out because, following November 1917, a great number of organizations that were hostile to Lenin’s Bolsheviks had arisen. They were referred to as the whites as a group, while the reds were the name given to the Bolsheviks. A Bolshevik was a member of the Communist Party of Russia… The fact that the Bolsheviks had so many rivals contributed to the outbreak of civil war.

In what ways did the Russian Revolution impact the economy of Russia?

The political upheaval that had ensued in the wake of the February Revolution had made an already difficult situation much worse for the economy. There was a dramatic drop in labor productivity, which resulted in a decrease in production, as well as an increase in the severity of food and fuel shortages in metropolitan areas… War Communism was the end outcome for the economy of the Soviet Union.

What were the political, social, and economic factors that led to the Russian Revolution?

Factors that led to the outbreak of the Russian Revolution… A number of factors, including rampant inflation and a lack of available food, led to the uprising in Russia. Inadequate military supplies, logistics, and armament led to devastating casualties for the Russians during World War I. As a result, Russia’s perception of Nicholas II continued to decline.

What Kind Of An Effect Did World War One Have On The Russian Economy?

By the middle of 1916, the two years of war that had been raging had completely destroyed the Russian economy. It led to decreases in agricultural productivity, issues in the transportation network, monetary inflation, and acute shortages of food and fuel in urban areas, and it generated problems in the transportation network.

Why was it that the Bolsheviks were able to win the civil war and take control of Russia, and what were the reasons why the Russian Revolution of 1917 occurred?

Why was it that the Bolsheviks were able to win the civil war and take control of Russia, and what were the reasons why the Russian Revolution of 1917 occurred?
Why was it that the Bolsheviks were able to win the civil war and take control of Russia, and what were the reasons why the Russian Revolution of 1917 occurred?

What factors contributed to the Bolsheviks’ victory in the civil war and their subsequent consolidation of power in Russia? … The Bolshevik Party was established in March of 1917, which led Vladimir Lenin to believe that the time for the Bolsheviks to take power in Russia had arrived. Lenin came to the realization that it was essential to win the support of the masses by keeping the Bolshevik party’s pledges.

What Kind Of Changes Came About As A Result Of Russia’s February Revolution?

The most significant result of the February Revolution was the overthrow of the Russian monarchy and the formation of the Petrograd Soviet. Both of these events took place in February. During the October revolution, Vladimir Lenin, the head of the Bolshevik party, played a significant role. The Provisional Government was overthrown and replaced by his Bolshevik Party, which thereafter assumed power.

What kinds of social problems led up to the Russian Revolution?

The war with Japan resulted in Russia having less available food, which was one of the sociological causes that contributed to the Russian Revolution.
The number of hours that workers put in has increased.
Workers who were paid less for their work.
Hunger strikes were held because there were less groceries.
The ruler of Russia married the daughter of Russia’s archrival nation.
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There were riots over bread.
Check out how tall ancient Romans were as well.

What were the primary goals that the Russian Revolution aimed to accomplish?

The primary goals of the Russian Revolutionaries were as follows: I To bring about peace in Russia and to remove the country from participation in the First World War. (ii) The tiller should have ownership of the land. (iii) Allow the workforce to take control of the industry.

Class 9, what were the results of the October Revolution that took place in 1917?

The October Revolution of 1917 had a significant influence on the history of Russia, Europe, and the rest of the globe during the whole of the 20th century. It resulted in the formation of a communist regime, which for many decades was considered as an alternative not just to fascism but also to parliamentary democracy and the liberal market economy by a significant number of people living in Europe.

What were the primary factors that led to the revolt in February of 1917?

However, the tragic engagement of Russia in World War I was the direct cause of the February Revolution, which was the first phase of the Russian Revolution of 1917. Imperial Russia was no match for Germany’s industrialized military, and the number of losses suffered by Russia in World Conflict I was larger than those suffered by any other country in any other war.

Which Factors Played A Significant Role In Causing The Russian Revolution Quizlet?

Terms included in this group
Poverty. Since the vast majority of Russians lived in abject poverty, they had no compelling motive to maintain their allegiance to the Czar.
Ineffective leadership. …
Bloody Sunday. Rasputin. World War I…. The Russo-Japanese War…. World War I….
Effective Communist Party Leadership.

What kind of influence did the Russian Revolution have on the First World War?

What kind of influence did the Russian Revolution have on the First World War?
What kind of influence did the Russian Revolution have on the First World War?

The Russian Revolution made it possible for the Germans to shift their emphasis to the Western Front, and it also put pressure on the United States to increase the amount of help they sent to the Allies on both the military and economic fronts. German troops who were being held as POWs in Russian camps were infected with socialist views as well, and as a result, they exerted pressure on the German leadership to accept the armistice.

What Were Some Of The Reasons That Led Up To The Russian Revolution?

Principal motivating factor behind the Russian Revolution. Russia was suffering a defeat at the hands of Germany at the same time as people within the country were becoming hungry owing to food shortages caused by the war. As a consequence of this, there were demonstrations held all around the nation in 1917. Siberian concentration camps established by Stalin for the use of forced labor (the coldest region of Russia).

What were the factors that led up to the March Revolution and what were its results?

Due to Russia’s severe losses in World War I, as well as the country’s lack of faith in its administration, food and fuel shortages persisted.

What led to the outbreak of civil war in Russia and what were its consequences?

The Bolshevik party served as the movement’s driving force. The communist ideology and the principle that all people should be treated equally were disseminated by Lenin’s Bolsheviks. The Russian Civil War ultimately led to the formation of the Soviet Union as a result of its effects. Poland, Estonian Republic of, and Finland Within the boundaries of the Soviet Union, the independent nations of Lithuania and Latvia were founded.

Why did Lenin create the New Economic Policy (NEP), which was a compromise between the concepts of capitalism and communism?

Lenin’s goal was to improve Russia’s economy by strengthening the position of the working class. This new strategy made it possible for that to happen, brought the economy of the country back to the way it was before the war, and resulted in happy people across Russia.

Conflict internal to Russia

The Russian Civil War took place between 1918 and 1920 and was a battle in which the newly founded Bolshevik government headed by Vladimir I. Lenin was successfully defended by the Red Army against numerous anti-Bolshevik forces commanded by Russians and interventionists from other countries.

The beginnings of a fight

One of the key factors that led to the Russian Revolution of 1917, which overthrew the Romanov monarchy and imposed a government that was anxious to put an end to the conflict, was Russia’s terrible performance in World War I. A rift developed between the Bolsheviks (Communists) and the Left Socialist Revolutionaries as a result of the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk (1918), under which Russia ceded major areas of its territory to Germany. This resulted in the Left Socialist Revolutionaries leaving the alliance. In the following months, there was a marked drawing together of two main groups of Russian opponents of Lenin: (1) the non-Bolshevik left, who had been finally alienated from Lenin by his dissolution of the Constituent Assembly; and (2) the rightist whites, whose main asset was the Volunteer Army in the Kuban steppes. Both of these groups had been finally alienated from Lenin by his dissolution of the Constituent Assembly; however, the non-Bolshe This army, which had endured severe difficulties throughout the winter of 1917–18 and which came under the leadership of General Anton I. Denikin (April 1918), was now an excellent combat force, although having a limited number of soldiers.

At the same time, the Western Allies were keen to build another front in the east by resurrecting at least a portion of the Russian army in the spring of 1918 as they were being brutally pushed by a fresh German onslaught in northern France. This attack took place throughout the year 1918. At March of 1918, a small British force was allowed to arrive in Murmansk after receiving permission from the local soviet. On April 5, Japanese soldiers arrived in Vladivostok despite not having received any authority to do so.
A additional aspect was the Czechoslovak Legion, which was formed by deserters from the Austro-Hungarian army who were Czech and Slovak nationals. Earlier Russian administrations had given permission for these deserters to organize their own formations in the Russian army. In March of 1918, the Bolshevik government reached an agreement to allow these forces to evacuate Russia through the Far East. However, during the evacuation in May, violent episodes occurred, and on May 29th, Leon Trotsky, who was the commissar for war, ordered them to relinquish their guns. They did not comply, and after fending off efforts by the local soviets to disarm them, they managed to seize control of the Trans-Siberian Railroad. As a result of this action, a power vacuum was created, which allowed for the emergence of two anti-Bolshevik authorities: the West Siberian Commissariat, which had a liberal leaning and was based in Omsk; and the Committee of Members of the Constituent Assembly, which was made up of Socialist Revolutionaries and was based in Samara.

Because of these occurrences, the authorities in Moscow began a harsh campaign of repression against socialists who did not support the Bolshevik party. It was forbidden for Menshevik and Socialist Revolutionary representatives to participate in any kind of organized political action once they were ousted from both the central and local soviets. Eventually, in September, the government announced that it would be launching a campaign of “Red terror,” which included the death of hostages and the expansion of the Cheka’s (the political police) authority to conduct summary arrests, trials, and executions of individuals.

The assassination of the tsar, as well as the struggle for control of Ukraine

The former imperial family was one of the first groups of civilians to be killed during the civil war, which is generally seen as having started in earnest in June of 1918. In August of 1917, Tsar Nicholas II, together with his wife and children, were relocated to Tobolsk, and then in the spring of 1918, they were relocated to Yekaterinburg. The local soviet was concerned about the possibility of Nicholas being freed as a result of the growth of anti-Bolshevik elements in Siberia. On the night of July 16–17, 1918, each individual member of the family was led to the jail house’s basement, where they were executed by firing squad.
Late in the summer, the Red Army, which had been rapidly reconstituted by the Communists, was able to retake control of the majority of eastern European Russia. A new army was hurriedly formed at Omsk, which became the center of anti-Communist activity, under the direction of Adm. Aleksandr V. Kolchak, with the support of military missions from both the United Kingdom and the United States. During this time, British soldiers stationed in Murmansk were engaged in combat with Communist forces. During the month of August, further British soldiers arrived in Arkhangelsk, and the Japanese military presence in the Russian territories located in the Far East was significantly strengthened.

In Omsk, the Socialist Revolutionaries’ and Kolchak’s relationship continued to worsen over time. It was impossible for Kolchak and his officers to differentiate between Socialist Revolutionaries and Communists, so they grouped together all “Reds” as potential adversaries. Kolchak and his officers disapproved of the left-wing beliefs of the politicians. The struggle reached its climax on November 18, 1918, when Kolchak established his own dictatorship, which brought the conflict to its culmination. The fall of Germany and the conclusion of the war in Europe occurred at the same time as the coup d’état led by Kolchak.

At the start of 1919, units belonging to the Red Army invaded the Ukraine. The remains of the Socialist Revolutionaries’ troops, which were led by Symon Petlyura and fled in the direction of the west, where they eventually joined forces with Ukrainian nationalist forces hailing from what was previously Austrian Galicia. Throughout the subsequent months, the mixed Petlyurist-Galician forces held parts of Ukraine; other regions were in the hands of anarchist bands led by Nestor Makhno; and the main cities were held by the Communists, who ruled not directly from Moscow but rather through a puppet Ukrainian “government” in Kharkov (now Kharkiv). The loss of Germany had also opened up the Black Sea to the Allies, and in the middle of December 1918, some mixed troops under French leadership were landed at Odessa and Sevastopol, and over the following months, they landed at Kherson and Nikolayev.

Intervention from other countries

Now that the situation in Russia had become more complicated, the governments of the Allies needed to determine what course of action to take. It was therefore useless to try to reestablish an eastern front against Germany, which had been the original goal of the intervention. Exiled Russians believed that the Allies were obligated to assist them since the Russian administrations that came before the Bolshevik revolution had a history of supporting the Allies. In addition to this argument on a moral level, there was also the political argument that the communist rule in Moscow constituted a threat to the whole continent of Europe because of the subversive propaganda it spewed and its drive to forward the cause of revolution.

At the beginning of 1919, the governments of France and Italy favored providing substantial support (in the form of munitions and supplies rather than in men) to the Whites (the name that was eventually given to the anti-Communist forces), whereas the governments of the United Kingdom and the United States were more cautious and even hoped to reconcile the opposing parties in Russia. The United States took the initiative in January to suggest to all Russian combatants that armistice discussions be held on the island of Prinkipo in the Sea of Marmara. This proposal was made by the Allies. The Communists were willing to accept, whereas the Whites were not. William C. Bullitt, a diplomat from the United States, traveled to Moscow in March and brought back peace offers from the Communists. These peace initiatives, however, were rejected by the Allies. Following this event, the Allies stopped attempting to negotiate peace terms with the Communists and instead provided additional support to Kolchak and Denikin.

However, the direct engagement of armed forces belonging to the Allies was on a relatively minor scale, with a total of about 200,000 troops participating in it. As a result of the confusion caused by the conflict between Russian Communists, Russian Whites, and Ukrainian nationalists in Ukraine, the French withdrew their soldiers during the months of March and April 1919, despite the fact that they had rarely fired a shot. Although there was considerable combat on the part of the British in the Arkhangelsk and Murmansk regions, the northern front had a very modest role in the overall course of the civil war. At the beginning of October in 1919, the last of the British soldiers stationed in Arkhangelsk and Murmansk withdrew from both cities. Only the Japanese, who had deliberately entrenched themselves in the several provinces of the Far East, could be considered “interventionists,” and they were the only ones who posed a genuine threat.

The triumph of the Soviet Red Army

The eastern front was where the majority of the combat took place during the first half of 1919. In April, Kolchak had reached the pinnacle of his achievements in the Urals and continued to make headway there. The counteroffensive launched by the Red Army on the 28th of April. Following the fall of Ufa in June, Kolchak’s army were forced to retreat into Siberia while being harried by partisans. By the time summer was out, the getaway had turned into a rout. In November, Kolchak established a government in Irkutsk; however, the Socialist Revolutionaries were able to topple that government in December. He was the one who turned himself in to the Communists in January of 1920, and he was executed on February 7 of that same year.

In the meanwhile, towards the end of the summer of 1919, Denikin had made one more attempt in European Russia. By the end of August, the majority of Ukraine was under the control of the White Army. Petlyura was antagonistic toward Denikin, but the Galicians preferred him over the Poles, whom they perceived to be their primary adversary. The Communists had been expelled, and the Ukrainian nationalists were split in their position toward Denikin. Petlyura was hostile toward Denikin. In September, the White troops proceeded on Moscow from Ukraine and the lower Volga region after beginning their advance farther north. They started taking Oryol on October 13th. Gen. Nikolay N. Yudenich, on the other hand, made his way from Estonia to the outskirts of Petrograd at the same time (St. Petersburg). However, Red Army counterattacks were successful, and both cities were spared. Yudenich withdrew into Estonia, and Denikin, whose communications had been significantly overextended, was forced back from Oryol in an increasingly disorganized march that culminated in the evacuation of the remains of his army from Novorossiysk in March of 1920. Petlyura and Józef Pisudski, the leader of Poland, formed an alliance in April 1920, which resulted in a coordinated attack that overran a significant portion of Ukraine and led to the beginning of the Russo-Polish War.

In 1920, there was still an organized White army in Crimea. It was led by General Pyotr N. Wrangel, and it attacked the Red Army from the north. As a result, it seized a portion of Ukraine and Kuban for a period of time. Wrangel’s troops were finally defeated by the Red Army, but their rearguards managed to hold out for long enough to allow for the safe evacuation of 150,000 soldiers and civilians from Crimea by sea. In November of 1920, this brought an end to the Russian Civil War.

The war’s toll and its repercussions are being taken into account.

The Russian Civil War was responsible for the loss of up to 10 million lives, the vast majority of which were civilians killed in the conflict. The Cheka was responsible for the deaths of thousands of people who were believed to oppose the Bolsheviks, and daily life for the peasants was a living hell. Malnutrition and disease were rife as a direct result of Lenin’s policy of seizing large amounts of food throughout the country. Typhus was the most prevalent disease. Even the little supplies that the government had made available were unable to be distributed since transportation had almost completely broken down. The number of operational locomotives in Russia dropped from more than 17,000 to less than 4,000 between the years 1914 and 1920, and the country’s rail network, which had been under the hands of White Armies for the most of the conflict, was obliterated in the process. In the metropolitan areas, wooden homes were demolished to be used as fuel, and urban workers, who were theoretically the basis of the Soviet administration, started to disappear back into the countryside.

The different nationalist movements of the peoples who were not Russian suffered a loss as a direct result of the triumph of the Communist party. During the course of the civil war, the Tatars and Bashkirs whose homelands were between the Kazan region and the southern Urals saw their expectations dashed to pieces. However, in effect, the Communists subjected the population to the dictatorship of the Russian Communist Party, notwithstanding their public proclamation of the right to self-determination. The Muslim majority in Tashkent maintained its suspicion of any Russian administration, and for a number of years, nationalist guerrilla bands known as Basmachi tormented the Communist authorities.

As part of the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, Russia had handed over portions of Transcaucasia to the Ottoman Empire; however, this did not serve to do anything other than spark a temporary revival of the three separate Transcaucasian republics in May 1918. These republics were Azerbaijan, Armenia, and Georgia. The administration in Moscow had no intention of recognizing Transcaucasian independence for an extended period of time. In April of 1920, the government of Azerbaijan capitulated in the face of the twin dangers of an invasion by the Red Army and an uprising in Baku. The section of Armenia that had been a part of Russia was merged into Soviet Russia in December 1920, while the remainder of Armenia was acknowledged by the government in Moscow as being a part of Turkey at that time. The invasion and subsequent conquest of Georgia by the Red Army took place between February and April of 1921.

Since the spring of 1920, the illusion of a Far Eastern Republic that was independent of Soviet Russia was kept alive for the land that was located around Lake Baikal and to the east of it. In actuality, Moscow exerted complete and total influence over this regime. The representatives from Japan who attended the Washington Conference in 1921 and 1922 made a commitment to the government of the United States that they would remove all of their soldiers stationed on Russian territory. At the end of October 1922, they carried out the aforementioned action. The Far Eastern Republic had accomplished what it had set out to do, and in November of that year, its parliament agreed to officially dissolve the republic and merge it into Soviet Russia.

The Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic was the name given to the governmental system that was established after the conclusion of the civil war. In point of fact, the Soviets had very little significance. The Communist Party controlled almost everything, as shown by the fact that its members held every position in the Soviet of People’s Commissars as well as the most important positions in the administrative apparatus at all of the lower levels of government. Lenin was the dominant figure in the party’s Central Committee, which served as the party’s governing body.

Trotsky served as the commissar for war at this time, and in addition to having total command of the military forces, he was also significantly responsible for arranging supplies and for the mobilization of troops. Only Lenin was more powerful than Trotsky during this time. By 1919, the Red Army had significantly improved its standing in comparison to the forces of its White adversaries. The Communists were able to easily plan operations and move men because they held the central core of European Russia throughout the entirety of the civil war. This gave them an advantage over their adversaries, whose bases were located on the periphery and were cut off from one another. This simple fact of military superiority was also bolstered by the fact that the Communists held the core of European Russia throughout the conflict.

F.A.Q what were the causes and effects of the civil war in russia?

F.A.Q what were the causes and effects of the civil war in russia?
F.A.Q what were the causes and effects of the civil war in russia?

What were the reasons why Russia went into a civil war?

The answer to the question, “What were the causes and consequences of the civil war in Russia?” may be found in the “Hot Topics” section below.
Between 1918 and 1921, Russia was going to be torn apart by the Russian Civil War, which lasted for those three years. After November 1917, a large number of organizations that were hostile to Lenin’s Bolsheviks arose, which ultimately led to the civil war. These factions comprised monarchists, militarists, and even, for a brief period of time, countries from other parts of the world.

What kind of repercussions did the Russian Civil War have?

The conflict has resulted in both casualties and repercussions. The Russian Civil War was responsible for the loss of up to 10 million lives, the vast majority of which were civilians killed in the conflict. The Cheka was responsible for the deaths of thousands of people who were believed to oppose the Bolsheviks, and daily life for the peasants was a living hell.

What kinds of changes did the Russian Revolution bring about?
Overthrow of the Dictatorship

The autocratic rule of the Russian Emperor was overthrown as a result of the Russian Revolution. The Tsarist regime’s authoritarian control was finally brought to an end when a democratic government was set up in its place. The Romanov dynasty was put to an end as a result of this event.

What were the three primary motivating factors that led to the Russian Revolution?

The political, social, and economic conditions in Russia all contributed to the outbreak of the Russian Revolution.

Conclusion paragraph:

The Russian Civil War was a devastating conflict that resulted in the deaths of millions of people. It began with the October Revolution and ended with the victory of the Bolsheviks. The war had a number of causes, including class tensions, World War I, and the collapse of the Russian Empire. It also had a number of effects, including the rise of Stalinism and the spread of communism throughout Europe.

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